del.icio.us

More on Journal Articles: Ratings and Comments

Posted on November 22, 2007. Filed under: collaboration, del.icio.us, education, indexing, information, library 2.0, sharing, technology, universities, web 2.0 |

This post is further to my earlier post on Journal articles: ratings and comments (7th November, 2007).

Yesterday I attended the JIBS workshop: “Is Library 2.0 a trivial pursuit”. The presentations were all excellent. They included one by Dave Pattern, Library Systems Manager at the University of Huddersfield: “Making the catalogue a good place to be: Lipstick, cowbells and serendipity.” I asked the question:

“How long will it be before people can rate and comment on articles aswell as books; and how long will it be before we can find out ‘people who read/downloaded this article have also read/downloaded these articles’ ” and “Are fed search providers e.g. Exlibris looking at doing this sort of thing?” No-one was aware of anyone doing anything in this area.

However, Ale de Vries, Product Manager, Elsevier, in his presentation: “A publisher’s view of Library 2.0” mentioned 2collab, a beta system that will enable sharing and collaboration between researchers in particular fields. Ale’s presentation also included a last-minute slide (following my question earlier in the day) on how they are going to provide article download/useage information and rankings based on this. So perhaps the rating, recommendation and review of journal articles and papers is not far off.

Personally I think that this would work best as a mash-up of a del.icio.us type-system with a LibraryThing/Zotero type system so that you can save the references to the articles (and add your own tags and comments/reviews to them) wherever you have found them (e.g. within a web-based bib database to which your library subscribes or in a web-journal, e.g. Ariadne) and share them with your colleagues wherever they are based.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this? Anyone else blogging/writing elsewhere about this? Should I patent the idea?

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Podcasts and indexing

Posted on September 26, 2007. Filed under: del.icio.us, education, future, indexing, lectures, podcasting, students, technology, universities, web 2.0, You Tube | Tags: |

Brian Kelly’s post “The Future As Today, But More So” started me wondering whether today’s university students, who audio/video record their lectures (or whose lecturers provide them with recordings) bother to take full handwritten notes. Perhaps it is down to the individual student and the quality of the recording/accessibility/reliability of the technology. If it was me I would probably store the videos on my PDA and make the odd handwritten note (probably on my PDA) – e.g. points I want to find out more about or questions I want answers for, any urls/references given by the lecturer that I want to look up etc.). I would want to be able to link my notes with the podcast file.  When it comes to assignment or revision time, is it more time consuming to revisit all the video/audio files, or to read through a load of ‘old-fashioned’ notes to find the piece that you want? Perhaps lecturers/students are tagging their videos, eg. within YouTube or del.icio.us? Or maybe they are using free web2.0 software that enables them to either manually or automatically index their videos? If not then is this something that we will see in the future?

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